Slang meaning of moted

moted slang means: 1. An interjection shouted at someone who has been publicly humiliated. 1a. "Moted, corroded, your booty exploded." 2. Adjective describing such a person, i.e. "When she said that to him, he musta felt so moted." 3. General insult, i.e. "Those shoes are hella moted.". Contributor reports this as being very regional in its use. He doesn't think it's been heard outside the California state border. Even in CA it seems to have been confined to certain neighborhoods, with huge tracts of land between them totally ignorant of the word, as if it had teleported the distance. He thought it was a San Francisco Bay Area thing, but recently heard it referred to as "Valley slang" (S. California.) He remembers it from the early 90s, but its use apparently peaked in the 80s. Probably derives from "demoted." (ed: no sooner do we add information than it's updated... which is great! For example... see below. Ilana sent in the following) Your listing says it was particular to California, but you only list the Bay area (San Francisco) and the San Fernando Valley as places where you've gotten confirmed reports it was used. Well, I can add another area: I lived in Santa Monica (L.A.) in the 1970s and heard "moted" and "moted and corroded" all the time, at school. Although Santa Monica is only a handful of miles from the San Fernando Valley, it is definitely NOT the valley, culturally speaking; those really are two distinct areas, so you could add Santa Monica to your listing as a legitimate third part of California where the expression was used. (ed: so that clears *that* up... perhaps?)

What does moted mean in slang?

moted slang means: 1. An interjection shouted at someone who has been publicly humiliated. 1a. "Moted, corroded, your booty exploded." 2. Adjective describing such a person, i.e. "When she said that to him, he musta felt so moted." 3. General insult, i.e. "Those shoes are hella moted.". Contributor reports this as being very regional in its use. He doesn't think it's been heard outside the California state border. Even in CA it seems to have been confined to certain neighborhoods, with huge tracts of land between them totally ignorant of the word, as if it had teleported the distance. He thought it was a San Francisco Bay Area thing, but recently heard it referred to as "Valley slang" (S. California.) He remembers it from the early 90s, but its use apparently peaked in the 80s. Probably derives from "demoted." (ed: no sooner do we add information than it's updated... which is great! For example... see below. Ilana sent in the following) Your listing says it was particular to California, but you only list the Bay area (San Francisco) and the San Fernando Valley as places where you've gotten confirmed reports it was used. Well, I can add another area: I lived in Santa Monica (L.A.) in the 1970s and heard "moted" and "moted and corroded" all the time, at school. Although Santa Monica is only a handful of miles from the San Fernando Valley, it is definitely NOT the valley, culturally speaking; those really are two distinct areas, so you could add Santa Monica to your listing as a legitimate third part of California where the expression was used. (ed: so that clears *that* up... perhaps?)

Meaning of the slang word or phrase moted

moted slang means: 1. An interjection shouted at someone who has been publicly humiliated. 1a. "Moted, corroded, your booty exploded." 2. Adjective describing such a person, i.e. "When she said that to him, he musta felt so moted." 3. General insult, i.e. "Those shoes are hella moted.". Contributor reports this as being very regional in its use. He doesn't think it's been heard outside the California state border. Even in CA it seems to have been confined to certain neighborhoods, with huge tracts of land between them totally ignorant of the word, as if it had teleported the distance. He thought it was a San Francisco Bay Area thing, but recently heard it referred to as "Valley slang" (S. California.) He remembers it from the early 90s, but its use apparently peaked in the 80s. Probably derives from "demoted." (ed: no sooner do we add information than it's updated... which is great! For example... see below. Ilana sent in the following) Your listing says it was particular to California, but you only list the Bay area (San Francisco) and the San Fernando Valley as places where you've gotten confirmed reports it was used. Well, I can add another area: I lived in Santa Monica (L.A.) in the 1970s and heard "moted" and "moted and corroded" all the time, at school. Although Santa Monica is only a handful of miles from the San Fernando Valley, it is definitely NOT the valley, culturally speaking; those really are two distinct areas, so you could add Santa Monica to your listing as a legitimate third part of California where the expression was used. (ed: so that clears *that* up... perhaps?)

More slang meanings / definitions of 1. An interjection shouted at someone who has been publicly humiliated. 1a. "Moted, corroded, your booty exploded." 2. Adjective describing such a person, i.e. "When she said that to him, he musta felt so moted." 3. General insult, i.e. "Those shoes are hella moted.". Contributor reports this as being very regional in its use. He doesn't think it's been heard outside the California state border. Even in CA it seems to have been confined to certain neighborhoods, with huge tracts of land between them totally ignorant of the word, as if it had teleported the distance. He thought it was a San Francisco Bay Area thing, but recently heard it referred to as "Valley slang" (S. California.) He remembers it from the early 90s, but its use apparently peaked in the 80s. Probably derives from "demoted." (ed: no sooner do we add information than it's updated... which is great! For example... see below. Ilana sent in the following) Your listing says it was particular to California, but you only list the Bay area (San Francisco) and the San Fernando Valley as places where you've gotten confirmed reports it was used. Well, I can add another area: I lived in Santa Monica (L.A.) in the 1970s and heard "moted" and "moted and corroded" all the time, at school. Although Santa Monica is only a handful of miles from the San Fernando Valley, it is definitely NOT the valley, culturally speaking; those really are two distinct areas, so you could add Santa Monica to your listing as a legitimate third part of California where the expression was used. (ed: so that clears *that* up... perhaps?) or words, sentences containing 1. An interjection shouted at someone who has been publicly humiliated. 1a. "Moted, corroded, your booty exploded." 2. Adjective describing such a person, i.e. "When she said that to him, he musta felt so moted." 3. General insult, i.e. "Those shoes are hella moted.". Contributor reports this as being very regional in its use. He doesn't think it's been heard outside the California state border. Even in CA it seems to have been confined to certain neighborhoods, with huge tracts of land between them totally ignorant of the word, as if it had teleported the distance. He thought it was a San Francisco Bay Area thing, but recently heard it referred to as "Valley slang" (S. California.) He remembers it from the early 90s, but its use apparently peaked in the 80s. Probably derives from "demoted." (ed: no sooner do we add information than it's updated... which is great! For example... see below. Ilana sent in the following) Your listing says it was particular to California, but you only list the Bay area (San Francisco) and the San Fernando Valley as places where you've gotten confirmed reports it was used. Well, I can add another area: I lived in Santa Monica (L.A.) in the 1970s and heard "moted" and "moted and corroded" all the time, at school. Although Santa Monica is only a handful of miles from the San Fernando Valley, it is definitely NOT the valley, culturally speaking; those really are two distinct areas, so you could add Santa Monica to your listing as a legitimate third part of California where the expression was used. (ed: so that clears *that* up... perhaps?)?

Moted (a.): Filled with motes, or fine floating dust; as, the air.

Sea lion (): Any one of several large species of seals of the family Otariidae native of the Pacific Ocean, especially the southern sea lion (Otaria jubata) of the South American coast; the northern sea lion (Eumetopias Stelleri) found from California to Japan; and the black, or California, sea lion (Zalophus Californianus), which is common on the rocks near San Francisco.

Glacier (n.): An immense field or stream of ice, formed in the region of perpetual snow, and moving slowly down a mountain slope or valley, as in the Alps, or over an extended area, as in Greenland.

Caada (n.): A small caon; a narrow valley or glen; also, but less frequently, an open valley.

Strath (n.): A valley of considerable size, through which a river runs; a valley bottom; -- often used in composition with the name of the river; as, Strath Spey, Strathdon, Strathmore.

Cabrilla (n.): A name applied to various species of edible fishes of the genus Serranus, and related genera, inhabiting the Meditarranean, the coast of California, etc. In California, some of them are also called rock bass and kelp salmon.

Area (n.): Extent; scope; range; as, a wide area of thought.

Eschscholtzia (n.): A genus of papaveraceous plants, found in California and upon the west coast of North America, some species of which produce beautiful yellow, orange, rose-colored, or white flowers; the California poppy.

Rockfish (n.): Any one of several California scorpaenoid food fishes of the genus Sebastichthys, as the red rockfish (S. ruber). They are among the most important of California market fishes. Called also rock cod, and garrupa.

Audible (a.): Capable of being heard; loud enough to be heard; actually heard; as, an audible voice or whisper.

Quadrature (a.): The act of squaring; the finding of a square having the same area as some given curvilinear figure; as, the quadrature of a circle; the operation of finding an expression for the area of a figure bounded wholly or in part by a curved line, as by a curve, two ordinates, and the axis of abscissas.

Carse (n.): Low, fertile land; a river valley.

Swale (n.): A valley or low place; a tract of low, and usually wet, land; a moor; a fen.

Vale (n.): A tract of low ground, or of land between hills; a valley.

Digging (n.): Places where ore is dug; especially, certain localities in California, Australia, and elsewhere, at which gold is obtained.

Bottom (n.): Low land formed by alluvial deposits along a river; low-lying ground; a dale; a valley.

Half-heard (a.): Imperfectly or partly heard to the end.

Area (n.): A spot or small marked space; as, the germinative area.

Cirque (n.): A kind of circular valley in the side of a mountain, walled around by precipices of great height.

Listing (n.): The act or process of one who lists (in any sense of the verb); as, the listing of a door; the listing of a stock at the Stock Exchange.

Areas (pl. ): of Area

Travel (v. i.): To pass by riding, or in any manner, to a distant place, or to many places; to journey; as, a man travels for his health; he is traveling in California.

Voice (n.): Sound of the kind or quality heard in speech or song in the consonants b, v, d, etc., and in the vowels; sonant, or intonated, utterance; tone; -- distinguished from mere breath sound as heard in f, s, sh, etc., and also whisper.

Deep (superl.): Low in situation; lying far below the general surface; as, a deep valley.

Cottise (n.): A diminutive of the bendlet, containing one half its area or one quarter the area of the bend. When a single cottise is used alone it is often called a cost. See also Couple-close.

Area (n.): The superficial contents of any figure; the surface included within any given lines; superficial extent; as, the area of a square or a triangle.

Square (n.): An area of four sides, generally with houses on each side; sometimes, a solid block of houses; also, an open place or area for public use, as at the meeting or intersection of two or more streets.

Valleys (pl. ): of Valley

Basin (n.): A circular or oval valley, or depression of the surface of the ground, the lowest part of which is generally occupied by a lake, or traversed by a river.

Convallaria (n.): The lily of the valley.

Like to add another slang meaning or definition of 1. An interjection shouted at someone who has been publicly humiliated. 1a. "Moted, corroded, your booty exploded." 2. Adjective describing such a person, i.e. "When she said that to him, he musta felt so moted." 3. General insult, i.e. "Those shoes are hella moted.". Contributor reports this as being very regional in its use. He doesn't think it's been heard outside the California state border. Even in CA it seems to have been confined to certain neighborhoods, with huge tracts of land between them totally ignorant of the word, as if it had teleported the distance. He thought it was a San Francisco Bay Area thing, but recently heard it referred to as "Valley slang" (S. California.) He remembers it from the early 90s, but its use apparently peaked in the 80s. Probably derives from "demoted." (ed: no sooner do we add information than it's updated... which is great! For example... see below. Ilana sent in the following) Your listing says it was particular to California, but you only list the Bay area (San Francisco) and the San Fernando Valley as places where you've gotten confirmed reports it was used. Well, I can add another area: I lived in Santa Monica (L.A.) in the 1970s and heard "moted" and "moted and corroded" all the time, at school. Although Santa Monica is only a handful of miles from the San Fernando Valley, it is definitely NOT the valley, culturally speaking; those really are two distinct areas, so you could add Santa Monica to your listing as a legitimate third part of California where the expression was used. (ed: so that clears *that* up... perhaps?)?

Words, slangs, sentences and phrases similar to 1. An interjection shouted at someone who has been publicly humiliated. 1a. "Moted, corroded, your booty exploded." 2. Adjective describing such a person, i.e. "When she said that to him, he musta felt so moted." 3. General insult, i.e. "Those shoes are hella moted.". Contributor reports this as being very regional in its use. He doesn't think it's been heard outside the California state border. Even in CA it seems to have been confined to certain neighborhoods, with huge tracts of land between them totally ignorant of the word, as if it had teleported the distance. He thought it was a San Francisco Bay Area thing, but recently heard it referred to as "Valley slang" (S. California.) He remembers it from the early 90s, but its use apparently peaked in the 80s. Probably derives from "demoted." (ed: no sooner do we add information than it's updated... which is great! For example... see below. Ilana sent in the following) Your listing says it was particular to California, but you only list the Bay area (San Francisco) and the San Fernando Valley as places where you've gotten confirmed reports it was used. Well, I can add another area: I lived in Santa Monica (L.A.) in the 1970s and heard "moted" and "moted and corroded" all the time, at school. Although Santa Monica is only a handful of miles from the San Fernando Valley, it is definitely NOT the valley, culturally speaking; those really are two distinct areas, so you could add Santa Monica to your listing as a legitimate third part of California where the expression was used. (ed: so that clears *that* up... perhaps?)

Slang Meaning of moted

moted means: 1. An interjection shouted at someone who has been publicly humiliated. 1a. "Moted, corroded, your booty exploded." 2. Adjective describing such a person, i.e. "When she said that to him, he musta felt so moted." 3. General insult, i.e. "Those shoes are hella moted.". Contributor reports this as being very regional in its use. He doesn't think it's been heard outside the California state border. Even in CA it seems to have been confined to certain neighborhoods, with huge tracts of land between them totally ignorant of the word, as if it had teleported the distance. He thought it was a San Francisco Bay Area thing, but recently heard it referred to as "Valley slang" (S. California.) He remembers it from the early 90s, but its use apparently peaked in the 80s. Probably derives from "demoted." (ed: no sooner do we add information than it's updated... which is great! For example... see below. Ilana sent in the following) Your listing says it was particular to California, but you only list the Bay area (San Francisco) and the San Fernando Valley as places where you've gotten confirmed reports it was used. Well, I can add another area: I lived in Santa Monica (L.A.) in the 1970s and heard "moted" and "moted and corroded" all the time, at school. Although Santa Monica is only a handful of miles from the San Fernando Valley, it is definitely NOT the valley, culturally speaking; those really are two distinct areas, so you could add Santa Monica to your listing as a legitimate third part of California where the expression was used. (ed: so that clears *that* up... perhaps?)

Slang Meaning of VALSPEAK

VALSPEAK means: Valspeak is American slang for the jargon of Valley girls, as spoken in California in the early s.

Slang Meaning of VALLEY GIRL

VALLEY GIRL means: Valley girl is American slang for a member of a s youth culture based on the children of affluent parents characterised by their recreational shopping and hedonism. Valley girl is slang for valium.

Slang Meaning of hungro

hungro means: Used to describe a male usually, a dirty old man who has a particular 'look' in his eyes while looking at young girls. Used (with horror in the voice) as "What a Hungro", "I wish that Hungro would stop looking at me that way". Contributor said her and a friend made the word up while in Middle school but it quickly spread though the Southern california area for some reason. Considering they were in middle school the term 'dirty old man' seemed to be anyone over the aprox. age of 28. (ed: oops... )

Slang Meaning of sureño

sureño means: Chicano and Hispanic gangs usually from the southern part of California, who wear the color blue, symbolizing their gang and hood and the southern California region.  "Those fools up north will kill you if they find out you're a sureño." 

Slang Meaning of CALIFORNIA SPECIAL

CALIFORNIA SPECIAL means: California special is American numismatic slang for an artificially enhanced coin.

Slang Meaning of YODEL IN THE VALLEY

YODEL IN THE VALLEY means: Yodel in the valley is British and Australian slang for to perform cunnilingus.

Slang Meaning of ruth ann's

ruth ann's means: Rest area: heard throughout the Carolinas.(I've heard the term "ruth ann's" used by Gays in North Carolina since the early 80's. I think it may go back much further, having interviewed some Gay men who were young adults in the 1950's and they also used the word.).

Slang Meaning of hoopie

hoopie means: Not sure about this one, but the submission reads as follows: A generally dirty person from the country or the south.Also used to describe extremely stupid people. Used as "That girl needs to take a bath. What a freaking hoopie!". Bill said he believes the term originated, when the bottom fell out of, the barrel making trade. The displaced barrel makers, of the Tennessee Valley area, went to other areas for work. In those places they were known as hoopies. (ed: seems reasonable - but makes me wonder where Douglas Adams got hold of it when he called Ford Prefect a 'hoopie frood')

Slang Meaning of KANGAROO VALLEY

KANGAROO VALLEY means: Kangaroo valley is British slang for Earl's Court.

Slang Meaning of vegemite valley

vegemite valley means: "Travelling up the vegemite valley". Anus/Rectum (usu. with homosexual connotations).

Slang Meaning of jickie

jickie means: Derogatory term for a person from Northern England (living as an immigrant in America. Used in early 1900's and specifically referred to working class person from area around York. (ed: never heard this before so not even sure if the spelling is correct - help needed please).

Slang Meaning of Barf Me Out

Barf Me Out means: (1)Excl. You might of heard this come from a Valley Girl after you've said something offensive to her. Also used to describe something you do not particularly like. See Also: Make Me Barf, Gross Me Out, Gross Me Out the Door, Grodie.

Slang Meaning of INDIAN VALLEY LINE

INDIAN VALLEY LINE means: An imaginary railroad "at the end of the rainbow," on which you could always find a good job and ideal working conditions. (Does not refer to the former twenty-one-mile railroad of that name between Paxton and Engels, Calif.) Boomers resigning or being fired would say they were going to the Indian Valley. The term is sometimes used to mean death or the railroader's Heaven. (See Big Rock Candy Mountains)

Slang Meaning of SANTA'S GROTTO

SANTA'S GROTTO means: Santa's grotto is London Cockney rhyming slang for very drunk, intoxicated (blotto).

Slang Meaning of SANTA CLAUS

SANTA CLAUS means: Santa Claus is London Cockney rhyming slang for hands (paws).

Slang Meaning of dink

dink means: Penis or prick; common derogatory comment about someone such as "He's a dink", Note: California said to have used "dick" at that time and apparently still does.

Slang Meaning of beppo, bep

beppo, bep means: Also 'bep'. A derogatory term indicating that the subject of the remark is, basically, a dirty vagabond, although merely having the wrong brand of trainers is enough to prompt this remark in most South Wales schools. The term reputedly derives from a tramp of that name who lived in the Cardiff area of South Wales in the early eighties. Despite the fact that the poor man has long since passed away, I have heard children as far away as Newport using the insult "ah, yer bep", and in the town of Barry (nearer Cardiff) "Your mum shagged Beppo" is still a fairly common playground insult, even though no-one of that age knows who Beppo was (or, hopefully, what 'shagged' means). (ed: actually, despite the assertion he had carked it long ago, I was informed by "Mel" in Dinas Powis, Wales, that Beppo was alive and kicking at least up until Sept. 1999)

Slang Meaning of airey

airey means: The little paved area, below pavement level, usually surrounded by railings, outside the basement of a posh terraced house. The Contributor writes "My mum and dad also used this one, thirty years before me (I'm 24), and my mum thinks it's short for 'area'. Heard in the words chanted along to a ball-bouncing game. One, two, three, O'Lairey My ball went down the airey'. She has no idea who O'Lairey was or what he had to do with the airey.

Slang Meaning of mondo

mondo means: Huge, humongous. Davy gave Santa a mondo list of toys he wants for Christmas.

Meaning of Moted

Moted means: Filled with motes, or fine floating dust; as, the air.

Meaning of Sea lion

Sea lion means: Any one of several large species of seals of the family Otariidae native of the Pacific Ocean, especially the southern sea lion (Otaria jubata) of the South American coast; the northern sea lion (Eumetopias Stelleri) found from California to Japan; and the black, or California, sea lion (Zalophus Californianus), which is common on the rocks near San Francisco.

Meaning of Glacier

Glacier means: An immense field or stream of ice, formed in the region of perpetual snow, and moving slowly down a mountain slope or valley, as in the Alps, or over an extended area, as in Greenland.

Meaning of Caada

Caada means: A small caon; a narrow valley or glen; also, but less frequently, an open valley.

Meaning of Strath

Strath means: A valley of considerable size, through which a river runs; a valley bottom; -- often used in composition with the name of the river; as, Strath Spey, Strathdon, Strathmore.

Meaning of Cabrilla

Cabrilla means: A name applied to various species of edible fishes of the genus Serranus, and related genera, inhabiting the Meditarranean, the coast of California, etc. In California, some of them are also called rock bass and kelp salmon.

Meaning of Area

Area means: Extent; scope; range; as, a wide area of thought.

Meaning of Eschscholtzia

Eschscholtzia means: A genus of papaveraceous plants, found in California and upon the west coast of North America, some species of which produce beautiful yellow, orange, rose-colored, or white flowers; the California poppy.

Meaning of Rockfish

Rockfish means: Any one of several California scorpaenoid food fishes of the genus Sebastichthys, as the red rockfish (S. ruber). They are among the most important of California market fishes. Called also rock cod, and garrupa.

Meaning of Audible

Audible means: Capable of being heard; loud enough to be heard; actually heard; as, an audible voice or whisper.

Meaning of Quadrature

Quadrature means: The act of squaring; the finding of a square having the same area as some given curvilinear figure; as, the quadrature of a circle; the operation of finding an expression for the area of a figure bounded wholly or in part by a curved line, as by a curve, two ordinates, and the axis of abscissas.

Meaning of Carse

Carse means: Low, fertile land; a river valley.

Meaning of Swale

Swale means: A valley or low place; a tract of low, and usually wet, land; a moor; a fen.

Meaning of Vale

Vale means: A tract of low ground, or of land between hills; a valley.

Meaning of Digging

Digging means: Places where ore is dug; especially, certain localities in California, Australia, and elsewhere, at which gold is obtained.

Slang words and meanings

Slang Meaning of COPSHOP

COPSHOP means: Copshop is British slang for a police station.

Slang Meaning of TOKE

TOKE means: Toke is slang for food.Toke is slang for to smoke a joint, cigarette, pipe etc.Toke was old British prison slang for a lump of bread.

Slang Meaning of BAU

BAU means: Business As Usual

Slang Meaning of CLD

CLD means: it means cold

Slang Meaning of Sky Rocket

Sky Rocket means: Pocket

Tags: Slang Meaning of 1. An interjection shouted at someone who has been publicly humiliated. 1a. "Moted, corroded, your booty exploded." 2. Adjective describing such a person, i.e. "When she said that to him, he musta felt so moted." 3. General insult, i.e. "Those shoes are hella moted.". Contributor reports this as being very regional in its use. He doesn't think it's been heard outside the California state border. Even in CA it seems to have been confined to certain neighborhoods, with huge tracts of land between them totally ignorant of the word, as if it had teleported the distance. He thought it was a San Francisco Bay Area thing, but recently heard it referred to as "Valley slang" (S. California.) He remembers it from the early 90s, but its use apparently peaked in the 80s. Probably derives from "demoted." (ed: no sooner do we add information than it's updated... which is great! For example... see below. Ilana sent in the following) Your listing says it was particular to California, but you only list the Bay area (San Francisco) and the San Fernando Valley as places where you've gotten confirmed reports it was used. Well, I can add another area: I lived in Santa Monica (L.A.) in the 1970s and heard "moted" and "moted and corroded" all the time, at school. Although Santa Monica is only a handful of miles from the San Fernando Valley, it is definitely NOT the valley, culturally speaking; those really are two distinct areas, so you could add Santa Monica to your listing as a legitimate third part of California where the expression was used. (ed: so that clears *that* up... perhaps?). The slang definition of 1. An interjection shouted at someone who has been publicly humiliated. 1a. "Moted, corroded, your booty exploded." 2. Adjective describing such a person, i.e. "When she said that to him, he musta felt so moted." 3. General insult, i.e. "Those shoes are hella moted.". Contributor reports this as being very regional in its use. He doesn't think it's been heard outside the California state border. Even in CA it seems to have been confined to certain neighborhoods, with huge tracts of land between them totally ignorant of the word, as if it had teleported the distance. He thought it was a San Francisco Bay Area thing, but recently heard it referred to as "Valley slang" (S. California.) He remembers it from the early 90s, but its use apparently peaked in the 80s. Probably derives from "demoted." (ed: no sooner do we add information than it's updated... which is great! For example... see below. Ilana sent in the following) Your listing says it was particular to California, but you only list the Bay area (San Francisco) and the San Fernando Valley as places where you've gotten confirmed reports it was used. Well, I can add another area: I lived in Santa Monica (L.A.) in the 1970s and heard "moted" and "moted and corroded" all the time, at school. Although Santa Monica is only a handful of miles from the San Fernando Valley, it is definitely NOT the valley, culturally speaking; those really are two distinct areas, so you could add Santa Monica to your listing as a legitimate third part of California where the expression was used. (ed: so that clears *that* up... perhaps?). Did you find the slang meaning/definition of 1. An interjection shouted at someone who has been publicly humiliated. 1a. "Moted, corroded, your booty exploded." 2. Adjective describing such a person, i.e. "When she said that to him, he musta felt so moted." 3. General insult, i.e. "Those shoes are hella moted.". Contributor reports this as being very regional in its use. He doesn't think it's been heard outside the California state border. Even in CA it seems to have been confined to certain neighborhoods, with huge tracts of land between them totally ignorant of the word, as if it had teleported the distance. He thought it was a San Francisco Bay Area thing, but recently heard it referred to as "Valley slang" (S. California.) He remembers it from the early 90s, but its use apparently peaked in the 80s. Probably derives from "demoted." (ed: no sooner do we add information than it's updated... which is great! For example... see below. Ilana sent in the following) Your listing says it was particular to California, but you only list the Bay area (San Francisco) and the San Fernando Valley as places where you've gotten confirmed reports it was used. Well, I can add another area: I lived in Santa Monica (L.A.) in the 1970s and heard "moted" and "moted and corroded" all the time, at school. Although Santa Monica is only a handful of miles from the San Fernando Valley, it is definitely NOT the valley, culturally speaking; those really are two distinct areas, so you could add Santa Monica to your listing as a legitimate third part of California where the expression was used. (ed: so that clears *that* up... perhaps?)? Please, add a definition of 1. An interjection shouted at someone who has been publicly humiliated. 1a. "Moted, corroded, your booty exploded." 2. Adjective describing such a person, i.e. "When she said that to him, he musta felt so moted." 3. General insult, i.e. "Those shoes are hella moted.". Contributor reports this as being very regional in its use. He doesn't think it's been heard outside the California state border. Even in CA it seems to have been confined to certain neighborhoods, with huge tracts of land between them totally ignorant of the word, as if it had teleported the distance. He thought it was a San Francisco Bay Area thing, but recently heard it referred to as "Valley slang" (S. California.) He remembers it from the early 90s, but its use apparently peaked in the 80s. Probably derives from "demoted." (ed: no sooner do we add information than it's updated... which is great! For example... see below. Ilana sent in the following) Your listing says it was particular to California, but you only list the Bay area (San Francisco) and the San Fernando Valley as places where you've gotten confirmed reports it was used. Well, I can add another area: I lived in Santa Monica (L.A.) in the 1970s and heard "moted" and "moted and corroded" all the time, at school. Although Santa Monica is only a handful of miles from the San Fernando Valley, it is definitely NOT the valley, culturally speaking; those really are two distinct areas, so you could add Santa Monica to your listing as a legitimate third part of California where the expression was used. (ed: so that clears *that* up... perhaps?) if you did not find one from a search of 1. An interjection shouted at someone who has been publicly humiliated. 1a. "Moted, corroded, your booty exploded." 2. Adjective describing such a person, i.e. "When she said that to him, he musta felt so moted." 3. General insult, i.e. "Those shoes are hella moted.". Contributor reports this as being very regional in its use. He doesn't think it's been heard outside the California state border. Even in CA it seems to have been confined to certain neighborhoods, with huge tracts of land between them totally ignorant of the word, as if it had teleported the distance. He thought it was a San Francisco Bay Area thing, but recently heard it referred to as "Valley slang" (S. California.) He remembers it from the early 90s, but its use apparently peaked in the 80s. Probably derives from "demoted." (ed: no sooner do we add information than it's updated... which is great! For example... see below. Ilana sent in the following) Your listing says it was particular to California, but you only list the Bay area (San Francisco) and the San Fernando Valley as places where you've gotten confirmed reports it was used. Well, I can add another area: I lived in Santa Monica (L.A.) in the 1970s and heard "moted" and "moted and corroded" all the time, at school. Although Santa Monica is only a handful of miles from the San Fernando Valley, it is definitely NOT the valley, culturally speaking; those really are two distinct areas, so you could add Santa Monica to your listing as a legitimate third part of California where the expression was used. (ed: so that clears *that* up... perhaps?).



Copyrights © 2016 Voticle. All Rights Reserved.